Hygiene

The purpose of hygiene appointments is to prevent the formation or development of dental problems. One problem that can occur is periodontal disease, more commonly known as gum disease. Loss of teeth due to bone degeneration can happen quickly and quietly, and it can go unnoticed without regular dental care. Our trained hygienists are the perfect people to help you with your needs.

How Gum Disease Can Affect Your Life

Gum Disease and Heart Disease

Researchers have found that people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease as those without periodontal disease.

Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions. Patients at risk for infective endocarditis may require antibiotics prior to dental procedures. Your dentist and cardiologist will be able to determine if your heart condition requires use of antibiotics prior to dental procedures. (Perio.org)

Gum Disease and Stroke

Additional studies have pointed to a relationship between periodontal disease and stroke. In one study that looked at the causal relationship of oral infection as a risk factor for stroke, people diagnosed with acute cerebrovascular ischemia were found more likely to have an oral infection when compared to those in the control group.

(True or False) Gum Disease Is A Minor Infection

FALSE - The mass of tissue in the oral cavity is equivalent to the skin on your arm that extends from the wrist to the elbow. If this area was red, swollen, and infected, you would visit the doctor. Gum disease is not a small infection. Its result, tooth loss, leads to a very different lifestyle—dentures. The changes in your appearance, breath, and ability to chew food are dramatic.

(True or False) Bleeding Gums Are Normal

FALSE - Bleeding gums are one of nine warning signs of gum disease. Think of gum tissue as the skin on your hand. If your hands bled every time you washed them, you would know something is wrong. Other signs of gum disease include: red, swollen or tender gums; sores in your mouth; gums that have pulled away from the teeth; persistent bad breath; pus between the teeth and gums (leaving bad breath); loose or separating teeth; a change in the way the teeth fit together; and a change in the fit of partial dentures.

(True or False) Cavities Are The Number One Cause Of Tooth Loss

FALSE - Periodontal disease is the number-one cause of tooth loss. According to the 1996 American Dental Association/Colgate survey, U.S. dentists say gum disease is a more pressing oral health concern than tooth decay by a 2-to-1 margin.

(True or False) Gum Disease is Easy To Identify

FALSE - Millions of people don't know they have this serious infection that can lead to tooth loss if not treated. You should always get involved in your dental care, so that problems are detected in the early stages. You should inform your dentist if any signs of gum disease are present; or if any changes in your overall health or medications occurred in between visits. Most importantly, you should ask your dentist about your periodontal health and what method was used to evaluate its condition. This level of participation enables you to work in a team approach with your dentist to identify subtle changes that may occur in the oral cavity.

(True or False) Treatment For Gum Disease Is Painful

FALSE - New periodontal procedures including topical local anesthesia and over-the-counter medications, have made patients' treatment experiences pleasant and comfortable.

Dental Care After An Heart Attack

Tell your dentist if you are taking anticoagulants (blood-thinning drugs). These medications could result in excessive bleeding during some oral surgery procedures.